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Tell Me More - Various - Famous Jazz Singers: The Greatest Tracks (You Go To My Head) (CD)

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  1. Showing no small skill in aligning himself with music’s most powerful, Lange was last heard on Lady Gaga’s ‘You And I’ – one of the better tracks on ‘Born This Way’. 26 Teo Macero.
  2. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for The Greatest Soul Music Hits of All Time - Various Artists on AllMusic -
  3. The fourth CD gathers together sessions of standards Ella did with various "name" arrangers including Benny Carter and Gordon Jenkins. Altogether a more impressive body of work than most singers can manage over a lifetime, but for the First Lady of Song, only a prelude of what was to come.
  4. This two-disc, track set may not actually have “the best reggae hits ever,” as its title states -- and it doesn’t -- but it does have a surprisingly diverse (and seemingly random) collection of cool sides, including UB40 and Chrissie Hynde's reggaefied version of “I Got You Babe,” Peter Tosh's fiery take on “Johnny B. Goode,” Johnny Nash's smooth and hopeful “I Can See.
  5. Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Songs That Won World War II - Various Artists on AllMusic - Find album reviews, stream songs, credits and award information for Songs That Won World War II - Various Artists on AllMusic - Track Listing - Disc 1 The More I See You. Dick Haymes.
  6. Jul 15,  · Hank Williams: 'Your Cheatin' Heart' An icon of country music, Hank Williams Sr. recorded this song at his final studio session before dying on New Year's Day of Released after his death, the single would reach the top of country charts and become part of Williams' musical legacy.
  7. Identify songs by sound like Shazam, Genius and Musixmatch (which integrates ACRCloud Music Recognition Services). Play some music and click the button to recognize songs now. Please use Chrome, Firfox or Opera and allow our site to use your microphone.
  8. The rise of digital music threatens one of the greatest canvasses of art seen in the 20th Century - the record sleeve. Originally just a protective cover for the fragile crackly goods beneath, it soon evolved into a space for artistic expression in its own right, very often becoming as important as the music itself.

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